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Home & Business Security Systems in Puyallup, WA from Protect Your Home, an ADT Authorized Dealer, are here to help keep your home and family safe. Our many security packages allow you the flexibility you want and deserve to keep your business and family safe. Don't gamble with the safety of your family or posessions. With all the choices you have, we can help you find the home security package that works for you! For just around one dollar a day, your safety can be monitored 24 hours a day, 7 days a week! From break-ins to fire monitoring, natural disasters to gas leaks, our security systems will bring you peace of mind. The home security providers we work with are all top-notch and professional. Call us today at 1-855-446-5020!

A bit about Puyallup, WA

Puyallup, Washington (/pjuːˈæləp/ (listen) pew-AL-əp or /pjuːˈɔːləp/ pew-AWL-əp) is a city in Pierce County, Washington, about 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Tacoma[5] and 35 miles (56 km) south of Seattle.[6] The population was 37,022 at the 2010 Census and the Washington State Office of Financial Management estimated the 2014 population at 38,670. Named after the Puyallup Tribe of Native Americans, Puyallup means "the generous people". It is also home to the Washington State Fair, the state's main fair. In 1833, The Puyallup Valley was a maze of creeks and old forest growth. It was subjected to frequent floods and massive log jams from the meandering river. The first white settlers were part of the first wagon train to cross the Cascades at Naches Pass in 1853.[7] Native Americans numbered about 2,000 in what is now the Puyallup Valley in the 1830s and 1840s. The first European settlers arrived in the 1850s. In 1877, Ezra Meeker platted a townsite and named it Puyallup after the local Puyallup Indian tribes. The town grew rapidly throughout the 1880s and was incorporated in 1890, the first mayor being Ezra Meeker. The turn of the 20th century brought change to the valley with the growth of nearby Tacoma and the interurban rail lines. The Western Washington Fairgrounds were developed giving local farmers a place to exhibit their crops and livestock. During the early part of World War II, the fairgrounds were part of Camp Harmony, a temporary Japanese American internment camp for more than 7,000 detainees, most of whom were American citizens. Subsequently, they were moved to the Minidoka relocation center near Twin Falls, Idaho.[8]