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Get safe with Home & Business Security Systems in Sterling, VA. Protect Your Home, an ADT Authorized Dealer, is ready to help you choose a security package! You can get information on packages from Protect Your Home, an ADT Authorized Dealer. Pick the system that works best for your situation! Don't compromise when you need to keep your family safe. We will help you choose a security system that best suits your needs and budget. For just around one dollar a day, your safety can be monitored 24 hours a day, 7 days a week! Our security systems monitor everything - break-ins, gas leaks, fires and much more. Get trusted professional experience from us and your security provider. Call us today at 1-855-446-5020!

A bit about Sterling, VA

Sterling, Virginia is a census-designated place (CDP) in Loudoun County, Virginia. The population as of the 2010 United States Census was 27,822.[1] It is located northwest of Herndon, east of Ashburn, and west of Great Falls, and includes part of Washington Dulles International Airport and the former AOL corporate headquarters. Sterling is also home to the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office LWX (serving the Baltimore–Washington Metropolitan Area), as well as the Sterling Field Support Center, the National Weather Service test, research, and evaluation center for weather instruments. In the beginning of 1962, large farms made up the 1,762 acres (713 ha) of what today is called Sterling Park. Route 7, also known as Leesburg Pike, bordered what used to be Jesse Hughes's dairy farm. Hughes arrived in Loudoun County in the early 20th century and was a longtime head of the county's Democrats. Fred Franklin Tavenner, who was somewhat related to Benjamin Franklin, operated vast stretches of Sterling Farm at the southwest fringes of Sterling Park. Tavenner had purchased land from Albert Shaw, Jr., who had inherited it from his father Albert B. Shaw, editor and publisher of the American Review of Reviews. One of Shaw's spreads, totaling 1,640 acres (660 ha), was called "The Experimental Farm" because it was one of the first area farms to receive a U.S. grant for applying "scientific methods", as Tavenner called them. According to Tavenner, refugees from the Soviet Union ran the farm while Shaw remained in New York City.[2]